|| home || forums || press || feedback || contact || 
== Not yielding to faster traffic == == Other Information ==

This page explains what the fabled Left Lane Bandit (to be referred to from here on as "LLBs") is. As you might have guessed, LLBs are my biggest pet peeve on the roads. If not for having to deal with several of these fools on a daily basis, I might never have even started this site - they're THAT annoying.

Unfortunately for many of us, the sign pictured above is quite possibly the most-ignored road sign in America. People don't seem to understand that the far left lane is for passing, and if you aren't passing (and aren't sitting in traffic that prevents you from doing so), you do not belong there... no ifs, ands, or buts. Sadly, some are just too ignorant to realize that they are disrupting the flow of traffic and causing other drivers to have fits. Even worse, some are NOT ignorant of this fact, but rather clog up the left lane on purpose because they like to pretend they're traffic cops, which is not acceptable. So in case it's not clear enough already: if you're not passing people, stay out of the number-one lane!

It's sad that this kind of behavior is permitted to go on constantly without punishment, because most police departments are too concerned with writing useless speeding tickets to enforce laws that actually make commuting a bit less stressful.

Most common annoyances
Not yielding to faster traffic ("left-lane bandits")
Failing to signal lane changes
Moving over at the last possible second
Tailgating in heavy traffic
High-beam usage
Rubbernecking
Neglecting to move over when making turns
Coming to a near-stop at railroad crossings

Less common annoyances
Jamming on the brakes upon seeing someone pulled over
Crawling on high-speed entrance ramps
Forgetting that green means go
Not yielding to other cars when lost
Poor-weather driving etiquette
In-car distractions
Stopping at the end of an entrance ramp

Non-driving annoyances
Law enforcement
Parking maladies
Landscapers
© 2001-2006 k-rad networks